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Title IX FAQs

Title IX FAQ's

What is sexual harassment under Title IX?

Sexual harassment is defined by Title IX as conduct on the basis of sex that satisfies one or more of the following:

  • An employee of the recipient (PCC) conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the recipient on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct;
  • Unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity;
  • Sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking.

What is consent?

Please take a look at a great definition of consent on the RAINN page.

How do I file a sexual harassment report?

Please see the How to File a Complaint section on PCC’s Title IX page for your options on how to report.

Will PCC retaliate against me or allow someone to retaliate against me if I report an act of harassment, discrimination, or violence?

No. Retaliation is strictly prohibited both by Federal Title IX guidelines and PCC policy. You will be protected from retaliation.

Do I have to choose to report to the Title IX office or to the police? Can I report to both?

You can report to either, or to both. Keep in mind that the Title IX office can only investigate if the person who committed the harm is affiliated with PCC (i.e. employee or student); however, we can provide you with resources even if there is no affiliation.

What if I was sexually assaulted a long time ago – can I still report?

Yes, you can still make a report. If the person who committed the harm is affiliated with PCC, we can still investigate. Know that the more time that passes between the alleged incident and the time you report can make it challenging when it comes to witnesses and gathering evidence, but we still encourage you to report. If you were assaulted by someone outside of PCC, we can still provide you with resources that may help you.

What resources are available to me if I make a report?

There are a variety of College and community resources available – please see the Resources section on the Title IX page for this information. In addition, we can also provide you with supportive measures depending on the situation such as:

  • Enrollment adjustments such as class schedule modifications or withdrawals
  • Academic support such as extension of deadlines, or other course- or program-related adjustments
  • Referral to PCC Student Services such as Counseling or Financial Aid
  • Altering work arrangements for work-study students
  • No-contact orders between the parties
  • Timely Warnings

What resources are available to me if a complaint is made against me?

PCC is committed to due process for both Parties once a complaint is made. As such, we also offer Respondents the following:

  • Enrollment adjustments such as class schedule modifications or withdrawals
  • Academic support such as extension of deadlines, or other course- or program-related adjustments
  • Referral to PCC Student Services such as Counseling or Financial Aid
  • Altering work arrangements for work-study students
  • No-contact orders between the parties

If I make a report, who is going to find out?

PCC strives to maintain confidentiality to the extent possible. We will only disclose information to those on a “need to know” basis. We will never disclose details of your report to anyone not affiliated with the investigation and/or hearing process. If we need to communicate with your instructors, for example, we will only tell them you are working with our office.

Can I have someone with me during the Title IX process?

  • Yes, both Complainants and Respondents are entitled to have a support person with them throughout the process. A friend or family member can serve as your support person. Please know that support persons are not allowed to take an active role in the complaint process; they are there solely to provide you with support.
  • As part of the new 2020 Title IX regulations, both Parties are also entitled to a trained advisor who will take a more active role throughout the process. The Title IX office will explain the advisor role and requirements  to both Parties in greater detail once a report has been made.

Do the Title IX regulations apply equally to Complainants and Respondents?

The new Title IX regulations create many procedural safeguards that protect the interests of both Parties. The new regulations have increased the training requirements for those involved in the decision making process. These new requirements are designed to further protect the rights of both the Complainant and the Respondent. The focus of this process remains unchanged: to reach a fair result in a way that respects all individuals involved.

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